Recent Posts By Meg Sattler

A hope to sustain us

A hope to sustain us | World Vision Blog

Syrian refugee children in host communities are living invisible lives. (Photo: 2013 Meg Sattler/World Vision)

“Where there is breath, there is hope,” Meg Sattler writes today from Jordan about the children of Syria and their stories and voices crying out to be heard.

Will you listen?

My encounter with a child of Syria

My encounter with a child of Syria | World Vision Blog

15-year-old Ola speaks articulately about issues facing Syrian children. (©2014 Meg Sattler/World Vision)

For three years, too many innocent people in Syria have suffered — above all, the #childrenofSyria. They have seen homes, schools, and hospitals destroyed. They have borne the brunt of indiscriminate violence and witnessed unspeakable abuse. Millions have been forced to flee, while millions more are trapped inside Syria in horrific conditions.

Join World Vision, Save the Children, Mercy Corps, UNICEF, and UNHCR in preventing a lost generation of Syrian children. Sign our petition here.

Today, Meg Sattler, World Vision's communications manager for the Syria crisis response, describes meeting one of these children of Syria — a girl whose laughter would give way to tears without warning.

A rocket marked her birth

When 21-year-old Waed’s contractions spurred her to leave home and see her midwife, she knew she was about to give birth to new life. She didn’t realize that she would also be saving her own. As she was delivering her baby girl, Muna, in a nearby building, a rocket fell on her house. It was destroyed.

Preventing a lost generation

As the Syria crisis response communications manager for World Vision International, Meg Sattler has been reporting from Jordan about the Syrian refugee crisis.

Today, Meg tells the story of Yeman and Shamaa. As Syrian refugees living in Jordan, these best friends and next-door neighbors are getting a second chance at an education through World Vision's remedial program.

A letter to Muna, for our birthday

Meg Sattler, Syria crisis response communications manager for World Vision International, has been reporting from Jordan about the Syrian refugee crisis.

Today, Meg writes a heart-breaking letter to Muna, a Syrian child who shares her same birthday, exploring all the things she doesn't know how to explain to this innocent little girl.

A place to learn and call home

It’s been nearly three years since the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and many people there are still living in squalid conditions in camps. Families who had the means to leave the camps have now gone, and those remaining are among Port-au-Prince’s most vulnerable.

Knowing that even one child living in an unsafe and unsanitary camp is too many, World Vision is working on a project to help families move out of camps and into more durable accommodations. With World Vision helping to shoulder the burden of housing, families are able to invest their resources into their children's educations -- and most importantly, their futures.

Haiti will never be a lost cause

Last time I flew into Haiti, I was reading Ernest Hemingway’s "The Old Man and the Sea." I finished it just as the plane hit the tarmac of the broken-down Port-au-Prince airport. As I closed the book, I looked up and realized why it had resonated. The protagonist and his struggles at sea reminded me of this fascinating and broken place I’d come to call home -- a country where work happens, struggles continue, and yet "success" or any kind of respite seem so often out of reach.

It’s now been two years since the largest earthquake to hit the country in 200 years shook the life out of Port-au-Prince, causing chaos, destruction, death, and leaving more people homeless than the wrecked city could cope with. Journalists have come and gone, and the visiting groups of beaming, t-shirted volunteers have become less and less frequent. The work of aid agencies, the private sector, and the government has continued, with varying levels of success amid swathes of challenges, for 24 long months, and will continue for as long as there is the will, funding, and available resources.