Recent Posts By Joy Bennett

[Sri Lanka Bloggers] I don’t think it’s just the jet-lag talking

Joy Bennett traveled to Sri Lanka with our blogger team last week to experience firsthand how World Vision's sponsorship programs are making a difference in the lives of children, families, and communities in need. Along the way, she discovered just how stark poverty can be -- and how blessed we are as Americans.

How does she feel now that she's back in the United States? Read on to find out.

This post originally appeared on Joy's blog, Joy in This Journey.

[Sri Lanka Bloggers] We are one, but we're not the same

As the Sri Lanka bloggers continue their journey experiencing firsthand how World Vision sponsorship helps transform the lives of children and families in poverty, Joy Bennett shares a collection of pictures of a special moment -- meeting her two sponsored boys.

This post originally appeared on Joy's blog, Joy in this Journey.

As you read Joy's thoughts and view her pictures, consider this: How are these children and their mother like families you know right here in the United States? What dreams could they pursue -- and what goals could they achieve -- with the same access to life-giving essentials that we're used to as Americans?

[Sri Lanka Bloggers] I’m scared, but that’s good

You may remember Joy Bennett from our Bolivia Bloggers trip last year. Joy has graciously agreed to travel with World Vision to the field again -- this time, to Sri Lanka.

This may be her second trip, but that doesn't mean it's not a step out of her comfort zone. Joy shares some of her anxieties about traveling and how she sees God working amidst it all.

At the same time, Joy's husband, Scott, has watched how she has been prepared for these trips -- and how they have shaped her. He is excited to see her through her journey a second time. Read thoughts from both of them below.

When Mother's Day hurts

In honor of Mother's Day, May 13, we asked bloggers to share their thoughts on motherhood -- and the importance of caring for children who have experienced the loss of a parent.

Starting today and going through Mother's Day, we will feature a different blogger each day to remind us to appreciate mothers and care for those who are hurting. Our first post comes from Joy Bennett, who traveled to Bolivia with World Vision on our blogger trip last August.

What I don't want for Christmas | Blog 3 of the 12 blogs of Christmas

In today's world, Twitter, Skype, and email have become the most common means of communication. So an old-fashioned handwritten note is particularly endearing. When I received Joy's submission for our 12 blogs of Christmas project, I was pleasantly surprised that it was crafted on a yellow note pad, in neat cursive, purposefully handwritten. And, as I would expect from Joy, straight from her heart. -Lindsey Talerico-Hedren, managing editor for the WV blog

Bringing death in Africa to life in America [LINK UP]

“Can I have a snack?”

“I’m so hungry mom. Is it dinnertime yet?”

“I’m starving – what can I eat? No, I don’t want that. Do you have ____?”

So much of my day revolves around my children ruled by their bellies. They eat three meals and a snack. The youngest, with his medical condition that requires additional calories, eats two snacks and, if given the chance, would graze all day long.

They fill the air with misery if I dare suggest not eating right that instant. And the days I’m caught empty-handed when they decide they’re hungry? The wailing and gnashing of teeth makes me want to rip my hair out, don sackcloth and ashes, and carry a banner touting “Meanest mom alive.”

When I returned from visiting Bolivia, I could no longer smile indulgently at our obsession with food. After seeing true poverty, and meeting people so poor they could only eat two meals a day (no snacks!), I realized that none of us have any idea what being hungry really means.

[Bolivia bloggers] Day 7: Sex and poverty

Paulo has 8 children ranging in ages from 14 years to 6 months. Three of them walk 2 hours to school and 2 hours home. He told us that he used to live near the mines, but it wasn’t a safe place for children. He bought the land in the mountains where we visited him, and moved his family there. But he can’t grow enough in his fields to feed them all.

[Bolivia bloggers] Day 4: Six months ago she couldn’t have done this

I want to introduce you to Lizeth. She latched onto my Flip camera at the Special Needs Center where she is a student.

[caption id="attachment_7055" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="The confetti in my hair is a blessing from the mothers of the Special Needs Center. ©2011 Amy Conner for World Vision"][/caption]

Lizeth is just like my kids — figured out the camera’s buttons in about half a second. For the next half hour, she ran around recording everyone she could find, her bubbly laugh echoing around the center.