Recent Posts By Guest blogger

Birthday celebrations: Wild for World Vision!

"Wild for World Vision! That’s what I am, and that was the theme of my 13th birthday party this year!"

Emily Hadigian turned 13 in January. But this year, she wanted to use the gift-giving part of her birthday celebration as a donation to World Vision, using it to help change the world.

A doll named Alma

Today's guest post comes from Alexis Dionne, a World Vision sponsor who shares what she does to let her sponsored children know they're loved and cared for during the holiday season.

If you're a World Vision sponsor as well, you can log in to My World Vision for ideas on how to connect with your sponsored child as the holidays approach.

Biker mom makes the dough

Poverty affects almost every element of a family’s life. It often robs children of their childhoods and can hinder strong, sustainable communities from being built.

But as shown by the story of Sam Mai and her family in Cambodia, a microloan can provide hope for something more -- an independent, self-sufficient future.

A birthday celebration that will help change lives

Bethany Detweiler didn't want a ordinary birthday, so she did something extraordinary.

Instead of asking for presents, she set a goal to raise $12,000 through My Gift Catalog, a tool that gives users the opportunity to raise funds to donate items through World Vision's Gift Catalog.

Bethany shares what inspired her to help others -- and how she plans on reaching her goal.

A girl's journey from brick factory worker to outstanding student

Today has been declared by the United Nations as the International day of the Girl. To commemorate this day, we're asking you to advocate on behalf of girls like Keota in Cambodia.

A brick factory is no place for an 11-year-old girl. But each day, Keota would spend hours stacking heavy bricks in a dusty, dangerous workplace to supplement her parents' meager income.

Now, thanks to World Vision, Keota is back in school, earning good grades and helping her little sisters with their studies.

Morning tea with Kate Middleton

This week, Prince William and his wife, Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, visited World Vision's programs in the Solomon Islands as part of their Diamond Jubilee tour.

Koisau Sade, gender issues coordinator for World Vision in the Solomon Islands, had tea with the Duchess and shared about how World Vision is working to put a stop to domestic abuse there.

Sharing my story with the royal couple

Today, Ellison was given the opportunity of a lifetime -- to share with the royal couple how his life has been changed through World Vision's work in the Solomon Islands. Prince William and Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, are paying a visit to our programs there as part of their Diamond Jubilee tour to celebrate the Queen's 60 years on the throne.

Read on to hear Ellison's story in his own words.

Lopez Lomong: "The fourth lap, help me God!"

In the third part of the Lopez Lomong series, Lopez shares his thoughts as he races at the 2007 NCAA 1500m championships. As he runs, Lopez reflects on the role that running has played throughout his life. Previously, running meant escaping rebel soldiers and the harsh realities of life within a refugee camp. As a student and athlete at Northern Arizona University, he dreams that running will be the key to a better life for the lost boys and the people of South Sudan.

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A sponsor's story of finding Samuel Isaac

Today's guest contributor is a child sponsor who told her inspiring story of faith as part of our "What Moves You" campaign -- a space where World Vision supporters share their reasons for joining our global efforts against poverty and injustice.

In order to protect her identity, we won't be sharing her name, but please read how her battle with infertility led her to a very special little boy named Samuel Isaac.

Lopez Lomong: September 11, the day I became an American

In the first installment of the Lopez Lomong series, we shared Lopez's terrifying experience of being ripped away from his parents by rebel soldiers at the age of 6. After his kidnapping, Lopez was taken to a camp where boys were forced to become rebel soldiers, killing other people, or dying themselves.

From there, a series of miracles occurred. Lopez was befriended by three older boys in the camp, who rescued him and fled the camp on foot at night. After running for three days and nights, the boys found themselves at a refugee camp in Kenya.

Lopez lived there for the next 10 years, dreaming of what else life might hold and growing closer to God each day. He prayed that one day he would be able to leave the refugee camp and find a new life. His prayers were answered when a family in the United States near Syracuse, New York, decided to adopt him as their own.

Part 2 of the series picks the story up after Lopez moved to the United States. It was only a short time that Lopez had been here when the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred. As his new home was under attack, Lopez struggled to reconcile the haunting memories of wars and violence in Sudan with the expectations of new life and safety in America.

Read on to learn how this experience shaped him.

Lopez Lomong's childhood story of terror

Today's post is the first in a series that recounts the life story of Lopez Lomong, who will run with Team USA in the London 2012 Olympics, with dreams of bringing home a gold medal.

While his current life sounds like a dream come true, his childhood was more like a nightmare. Born in war-torn South Sudan, Lopez was kidnapped by rebel soldiers at the age of 6 with two foreseeable futures: being forced to kill as a child soldier, or being killed himself.

Part one of the series tells the story of this dark chapter of Lomong's life. Follow along as we hear from him on his abduction, being adopted into the United States, and the realization of his Olympic dreams through his new book, "Running For My Life."

John Lennon: A sponsored child who imagines, too

There's one well-known John Lennon who wrote and performed a famous song about imagining. But another is a 15-year-old boy from the Philippines who imagines something of his own -- a better future and an opportunity to pursue his dream of becoming a teacher, thanks to his sponsorship through World Vision.

Lopez Lomong: From Sudanese 'Lost Boy' to U.S. Olympian

Today's guest contributor, Lopez Lomong, will run with Team USA in the London 2012 Olympics at the end of the month. But behind his remarkable accomplishment is a turbulent -- and inspiring -- life story of danger, poverty, and ultimate redemption.

Now, this South Sudan native is partnering with World Vision to bring help and hope to children and families in his home country who continue to struggle one year after the celebration of its independence. Read the story of Lopez, and let us know your thoughts!

Gaming for a greater cause

World Vision recently announced an exciting new partnership that reaches into territory we've never been before: online gaming.

Verge Games created Grumpy Goats with the aim to provide an online gaming experience with a greater purpose: donating a real goat to a family in need through World Vision's Gift Catalog.

Today's guest contributor, Bob Regular, president of Verge Games, shares his vision and heart for this idea.

Mother's day thoughts: Tiny for the wrong reason

In honor of Mother’s Day, May 13, we asked bloggers to share their thoughts on motherhood -- and the importance of caring for children who have experienced the loss of a parent. Every day through Mother’s Day, we will feature a different blogger to remind us to appreciate mothers and care for those who are hurting. Today’s post comes from Lindsey, who is the author of The Pleated Poppy. Photos by Michelle Siu/World Vision.

Helping my homeland: Why I sponsor a child in India

Aparna Sen, a World Vision sponsor, shares how her experience as a child growing up in Calcutta shaped her desire to help girls in India get an education and avoid discrimination and early marriage.

Recently, Aparna and her husband, Ritwick Dhar, had the opportunity to travel to India to meet 12-year-old Rebika, whom Aparna sponsored after becoming acquainted with World Vision and our work in her native country.

30 Hour Famine: A crash course in global hunger

This weekend, thousands of students across the country will participate in World Vision's 30 Hour Famine -- an event where teenagers fast for 30 hours, learn about global hunger, and raise funds to feed and care for hungry children around the world.

Nicole, a home-school mom and youth leader, started doing the Famine when she was 16. Nicole offers some incredible insight, having seen the Famine from the perspective of both a student and a leader. We asked her to share why she does the Famine.

When half a camel is enough

Today's guest contributor, bestselling author Debbie Macomber, shares her story of teaching her grandchildren a powerful lesson on charity and compassion. Her publisher, Random House, made a generous donation to support World Vision's work to improve education here in the United States.

A story of two Sams

Heather Althoff's family sponsors a Ugandan boy named Sam. Below, Heather shares her story of meeting Sam and his family. Wondering how sponsoring a child can bless your life and perspective just as profoundly as it does the life of the child you help? Here's a story for you.